Data and Statistics

  • A woman is beaten every 15 seconds.  (Uniform Crime Reports, Federal Bureau of Investigation, 1991)

  • The American Medical Association now estimates that almost 4 million women are  victims of severe assaults by boyfriends and husbands each year and about one in four  women is likely to be abused by a partner in her lifetime.    (Sarah Glazer, “Violence Against Women”, CQ Researcher, Congressional Quarterly,   Inc., Vol. 3 No.8, February 1993, p. 171)

  • Each day, more than three women in the United States are murdered by a male intimate  partner.  (United States Department of Justice, Bureau of Justice Statistics, Violence by Intimates, 2000)

  • Women are more often victims of domestic violence than victims of burglary,  mugging, or other physical crimes combined.  (“First Comprehensive National Health Survey of American Women,” Commonwealth Fund, July   1993)

  • In 1992, a congressional report indicated that the most dangerous place in the United  States for a woman to be is in her home. (Linda Ammons, Discretionary Justice: A Legal and Policy Analysis of Data on Crimes by   Current or Former Spouses, Boyfriends, and Girlfriends, March 1998)

  • While women are less likely than men to be victims of violent crimes overall,  women are five to eight times more likely than men to be victimized by an intimate  partner.  (Bureau of Justice Statistics, National Crime Victimization Survey, 1992-1996, and FBI   Supplementary Homicide Reports, 1992-1996, reported to the U.S. Department of Justice,   Violence by Intimates: Analysis of Data on Crimes by Current or Former Spouses, Boyfriends,   and Girlfriends, March 1998)

  • Thirty percent of Americans say they know a woman who has been physically  abused by her husband or boyfriend in the past year. (Domestic Violence Advertising Campaign Tracking Survey (Wave IV) conducted of     Advertising Council and the Family Violence Prevention Fund. 1996)

  • Twenty-three percent of women experiencing severe physical domestic violence in the past year had  thought about taking their own life, compared to 4% of other women.  (Intimate Violence and Black Women’s Health, The National Black Women’s Project)

  • More than twice as many women were killed by their husbands, ex-husbands, or  boyfriends as are murdered by strangers.  (Arthur Kellerman, “Men, Women and Murder,” The Journal of Trauma, July 17, 1992,    pp. 1-5)

  • Seventy-eight percent of stalking victims are women.  Women are significantly more  likely than men are (60% and 30% respectively) to be stalked by intimate partners.  (Center for Policy Research, Stalking in America, July 1997)